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Comparison of the effect of Cyriax cross friction massage and a Nintendo Wii exerciseprogram for the treatment of pain in chronic lateral lateral epicondylitis

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Comparison of the effect of Cyriax cross friction massage and a Nintendo Wii exerciseprogram for the treatment of pain in chronic lateral lateral epicondylitis

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Samenvatting

The aim of this pilot study is to compare the effectiveness of a supervised exercise program using the Nintendo Wii tennis game, to Cyriax Cross friction massage in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis. Upon excluded subjects who didn’t meet the exclusion criteria and two dropouts from the cross friction group, ten subjects participated in the study (5 males, 5 females; mean age 50.4 (SD 3.5). Six subjects followed the Wii exercise program and four subjects received Crossfriction massage according to the Cyriax method. Subjects in the Wii exercise group (Wii) played during 25 min. twice a week. Subjects in the Cross friction massage group (CF) received eight min. of treatment twice a week. Both groups were treated during six weeks. Using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), pain levels were assessed at baseline and after completion of the program at six weeks. Outcomes were analyzed using the independent, dependent and paired sampled ttest. As a result, the difference in pre and post VAS scores was only significant within the Wii exercise group (p=.02), there was no significant difference found in pre and post VAS scores between the two intervention groups. To conclude, the Nintendo Wii exercise program had a significant effect on pain reduction in treatment of lateral epicondylitis.

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OrganisatieHogeschool van Amsterdam
InstituutGezondheid
Gepubliceerd in
Jaar2008
TypeBachelorscriptie
TaalEngels

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