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Relation between the amount of fat free mass and muscle strength

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Relation between the amount of fat free mass and muscle strength

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Background: The population in the Netherlands is aging and adults with an age of 18 and older are getting more overweight and obesity. One of the characteristics of aging is a change in body composition. Fat free mass (FFM) and muscle mass are decreasing and fat infiltration in the muscles could lead to decreased muscle functioning and thereby muscle strength. This process of decreasing muscle mass is named ‘sarcopenia’ and often leads to many problems like diminish physical functioning when people are getting older. Therefore, it is important to analyze the relation between FFM and muscle strength, for younger en older adults, adults with a low and high BMI and males and females. Aim: To determine the relation between the amount of FFM and muscle strength, and whether this relation is different for younger (18 – 39 years) compared to older adults (40 – 76 years), whether this relation differs for adults with a low BMI (BMI ≥ 30,6) or a high BMI (BMI < 30,6) and whether this relation is different for gender. Methods: Subjects were recruited in the surroundings of the research centre, by posting 5000 flyers. During a weight loss trail in a period of 9 weeks body composition and muscle strength were measured. FFM was measured by the BodPod and muscle strength with an JAMAR® Hydraulic Hand Dynamometer. Baseline data was used to analyze the relation between FFM and muscle strength. The significance level was set at p < 0,05. Results: Seventy one overweight adult males (n=17) and females (n=54) participated in the study. The mean age of the study population was 40 years and the mean BMI was 31,6. The mean FFM for males was 69,5 kg and 48,6 kg for females. The mean muscle strength was 47,0 kg for males and 28,9 kg for females. The results showed a significant relation between FFM and muscle strength (r = 0,793, p < 0,001). There was no significant interaction of age or BMI between FFM and muscle strength (r = 0,793, p = 0,874 and r = 0,812, p = 0,539 respectively). However, this study showed that there was an interaction of gender in the relation between FFM and muscle strength for males and females. Gender also appeared to be an effect modifier (p = 0,115). There was a significant relation between FFM and muscle strength for males (p = 0,002) and females (p = 0,002). It is notable that for the male participants 1 kg more FFM means 0,998 kg more muscle strength. For the females means 1 kg more FFM 0,429 kg more muscle strength, which is 57 percent less strength per kg FFM than the males. The mean amount of FFM was 20,8 kg more in males, which is a significant difference (p < 0,001). The differences in the amount of FFM between younger and older participants was 7,3 percent for males and 2,5 percent for females. Males were stronger than females(p <0,001), but within gender no significant differences were found in muscle strength in younger and older participants (males p = 0,094 and females p = 0,648). Also the quality of the muscles differs significantly in males and females (p = 0,026) Conclusion: In conclusion, this study indicates that there is a significant relation between FFM and muscle strength. This relation is not different in younger and older participants and in participants with a low or high BMI. Gender gives an interaction in relation between FFM and muscle strength.

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OrganisatieHogeschool van Amsterdam
InstituutBewegen, Sport en Voeding
Gepubliceerd in
Jaar2011
TypeBachelorscriptie
TaalEngels

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