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What is the relation between the usual protein intake and muscle mass in obese elderly (55+)

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What is the relation between the usual protein intake and muscle mass in obese elderly (55+)

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Background Most studies show that a diet rich in protein can improve the body composition (including muscle mass) and the metabolic profile compared to a diet with lower protein content. The Dutch National Food Consumption Survey suggests that Dutch people, including elderly, consume sufficient dietary protein. Although a number of different underlying mechanisms contribute to loss of muscle mass, inadequate protein intake can accelerate this process. This may contribute to sarcopenia; the age-related loss of muscle mass, muscle strength and impaired physical functioning. A higher protein intake might be necessary to prevent these losses of muscle mass. Methods The primary objective of this study was to determine the relation between appendicular muscle mass and usual protein intake in obese elderly. Secondary objective of this study was to determine whether the relation is different for animal and vegetable protein on the appendicular muscle mass. This study included 51 subjects, 17 males and 34 females, aged 55-76 years and with a BMI between 28 kg/m² and 51 kg/m². The appendicular muscle mass was measured by using the DXA-scan type: GE Lunar Prodigy / DPX-NT and the protein intake was obtained by using the 3-day dietary record, both measurements were done at baseline. The relation between appendicular muscle mass and usual protein intake in elderly was examined by using multiple linear regression analysis adjusted for confounders. Usual protein intake was also split up in animal and vegetable protein. Results There was a significant relation between appendicular muscle mass and total protein intake (P=0,017), but after adjustments for body weight and gender this relation was not significant anymore. There was no significant relation between appendicular muscle mass and animal protein intake and there was a significant relation between appendicular muscle mass and vegetable protein. Conclusion There is a significant relation between appendicular muscle mass and the usual protein intake in obese elderly (55+), but after adjustments for body weight and gender, the relation between appendicular muscle mass and total protein intake, was not significant anymore. Results show that the relation between appendicular muscle mass and vegetable protein is significant and the relation between appendicular muscle mass and animal protein is not. Further research is needed to determine whether protein intake is of influence on appendicular muscle mass and whether there is a relation between appendicular muscle mass, animal and vegetable protein. For further research a wider protein intake is recommended.

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OrganisatieHogeschool van Amsterdam
InstituutBewegen, Sport en Voeding
Gepubliceerd in
Jaar2012
TypeBachelorscriptie
TaalEngels

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