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Systematic Review of the Association Between Protein Intake and Health Outcomes in Hospitalized Children (0-19 yrs)

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Systematic Review of the Association Between Protein Intake and Health Outcomes in Hospitalized Children (0-19 yrs)

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The aim of this systematic review was to assess the evidence behind the association between protein intake and health outcomes in hospitalized children. The results in this review were based on clinical outcomes, nitrogen balance, and protein turnover. Included studies were prospective cohort studies, case-control studies, and (randomized) controlled trials published between 1945 and December 2014. Out of 786 studies provided by the search, 10 studies met the eligibility criteria and were included in this review. The results from individual studies are summarized in evidence tables and quality was graded as A (lowest level of bias), B, or C. For clinical outcomes, high protein intakes have small effects on growth compared to standard protein intakes, but in general these effects were so small they can be considered as insignificant. Lower losses in birth weight and shorter time to regain birthweight was observed in one study. Body length and head circumference was not significantly different in patients on high protein diets compared to standard protein diets. Length of hospitalization was not affected by higher protein intakes in included studies in this review. Nitrogen balance studies show higher retentions of nitrogen at increased protein intake, but no significant benefits were found. Nitrogen balance became positive more often in patients on high protein diets, but was not significantly higher than in patients on standard protein diets who generally remained in negative nitrogen balance. Protein turnover studies showed an increased protein synthesis and catabolism by higher protein intakes with positive protein balances. This effect was not observed in patients on standard protein diets. One study found that anabolism occurred in infants at a protein intake of 1.1 g/kg/d. The quality of the included studies was generally low and the subjects were predominantly infants. It was hard to combine data and make conclusions due to the differences between studies. Based on the results, higher protein intake did not meet the expectations of the individual studies. Clinical interventions with adequate dietary assessment methods to get a more precise view of dietary intakes are necessary.

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OrganisatieHogeschool van Amsterdam
AfdelingBewegen, Sport en Voeding
Jaar2016
TypeBachelorscriptie
TaalEngels

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