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Protein timing and healthy aging : Pulse, intermediate and spread feeding on physical performance and muscle mass

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Protein timing and healthy aging : Pulse, intermediate and spread feeding on physical performance and muscle mass

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Background Aging is associated with different physical changes such as lower muscle protein synthesis, loss of functional abilities, muscle weakness, and decrease in muscle mass and strength. New studies show that consuming more protein can prevent these problems. Timing is an important factor in stimulating muscle protein synthesis and maintaining muscle mass and function. This study aims to find the association of different protein timing strategies with muscle mass and physical performance in the elderly. Our research questions are: 1. What is the difference between pulse feeding, intermediate feeding and spread feeding on muscle mass (FFM appendicular) in the elderly (55+ years)? 2. What is the difference between pulse feeding, intermediate feeding and spread feeding on physical performance (PP) in the elderly (55+ years)? Methods This study uses the data of elderly people who are 55 years and older at the baseline of the VITAMINE study. The subjects were divided into three groups. In the pulse feeding group, 50% of the protein intake was consumed at dinner. In the spread feeding group the protein intake was evenly spread over three meals. The other subjects who fell out of the pulse and spread feeding groups were included in the intermediate group. The subjects were evaluated on lean mass (DXA-scan), physical activity (Modified Physical Performance Test) and three-day dietary records. Regression analysis was used to assess the association between the timing of protein intake and muscle mass and physical performance in older adults. Results The energy intake of the pulse feeding group was significantly lower compared to the intermediate group and the spread feeding group (P=0.030). However, protein intake was also lower, but nog significant (P=0.118).There was no significant association between pulse, intermediate and spread feeding on muscle mass and physical performance (P=0.145, P=0,638). Conclusion There is no association found between pulse, intermediate and spread feeding on muscle mass and physical performance.

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OrganisatieHogeschool van Amsterdam
OpleidingVoeding en Diëtetiek
AfdelingBewegen, Sport en Voeding
Jaar2017
TypeBachelor
TaalEngels

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