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Bringing home the dead

Ritualizing cremation in the Netherlands

Rechten: Alle rechten voorbehouden

Bringing home the dead

Ritualizing cremation in the Netherlands

Rechten: Alle rechten voorbehouden

Samenvatting

In the twentieth century, the religious landscape of the Netherlands has changed
quickly from one of the most Christian countries of Europe to one of the most
secularized countries. In 1909, 57% of the population were Protestant, 35% were
Catholic and only 5% were not religiously affiliated (Knippenberg 1992). This image
is in great contrast to the data from one century later. In 2006, 16% of the Dutch were
Catholic, 14% were Protestant, 9% belonged to other denominations or religions and
the biggest group of 61% was religiously unaffiliated (Bernts, et al. 2007).
Until the 1960s, in the Netherlands most people were born as either Catholic,
Protestant or Socialist and eventually went to school, made friends, married and
died as such (Van Eijnatten and Van Lieburg 2006). This structure that divided
society and in fact the whole of daily life into certain pillars of denomination is
called ‘pillarization’. In the past sixty years, the all-encompassing influence of
religious institutions decreased, crumbling the pillars of denomination, a process
called ‘depillarization’. As a result, not only church attendance diminished, in fact
the pillarized character of the whole of public life, varying from sports clubs to
schools unsettled.

Toon meer
OrganisatieHogeschool van Arnhem en Nijmegen
Jaar2012
TypeProefschrift
ISBN978-94-6191-170-4
TaalEngels

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