De grootste kennisbank van het HBO

Inspiratie op jouw vakgebied

Vrij toegankelijk

Terug naar zoekresultatenDeel deze publicatie

Why do the Netherlands and Germany differ on further European integration

Rechten: Alle rechten voorbehouden

Why do the Netherlands and Germany differ on further European integration

Rechten: Alle rechten voorbehouden

Samenvatting

The goal of this research is to examine the differences between the Netherlands and Germany, when it comes to European integration. The central question in this thesis is: “Why do the Netherlands and Germany differ on further European integration?”. Through desk research and field research, in the form of interviews with experts on the matter, the history of both the Netherlands and Germany with European integration has been examined. The research is structured in four sub questions, which deal with the European integration process from 1945 until now. Both the Dutch and German history with this subject is examined, as well as the relations between the two. The last sub question is a case study, which deals with a subject that is relevant to European integration, and topical: PeSCo, the new EU initiative on the field of security and defence.

The Dutch and German history with European integration has followed different routes, even though the outcome was the same for both. The newly formed West German state took part in European integration after Wold War Two, since it was an opportunity to become equal to the other Western countries. Germany also felt a responsibility for Europe, after it had been responsible for two World Wars. The Netherlands took part mostly, because they were dependent on the West German,
regardless of the Dutch Atlantic aim. This economic incentive would become a constant in the Dutch history with European integration. When the economic integration was, to a certain extent, completed in 1992 with the Treaty of Maastricht, the situation for Germany had changed significantly. The West and East German states had reunified in 1990, making Germany a central European power. In this new role, it felt a responsibility for European integration, and it called for the ‘deepening and widening’ of European integration. The Netherlands grew increasingly Eurosceptic after 1992, since their economic aim had been fulfilled, and the project was now ‘done’. This continued in in the 21st century. Germany developed itself in Europe’s economic powerhouse, and would therefore take the lead during the economic crisis of the 2010s, becoming Europe’s ‘de facto’ leader.

In PeSCo, the Dutch Euro pragmatic view, and the German more idealistic side, come together. The differences between the two countries are visible in this project. Germany does not want to work alone on a subject as sensitive as defence and military, and is looking for consensus across the board. And while Merkel is talking of a European army, the Netherlands only want concrete results and no ideological discussions.

There is not one, unequivocal answer that can be given to this question after the research. The answer is found throughout all these historical events and incentives, as explained above. Together, they are reason for the current differences between the Netherlands and Germany.

Toon meer
OrganisatieDe Haagse Hogeschool
AfdelingMO Europese Studies / European Studies
Jaar2019
TypeBachelor
TaalEngels

Op de HBO Kennisbank vind je publicaties van 26 hogescholen

De grootste kennisbank van het HBO

Inspiratie op jouw vakgebied

Vrij toegankelijk