De grootste kennisbank van het HBO

Inspiratie op jouw vakgebied

Vrij toegankelijk

Terug naar zoekresultatenDeel deze publicatie

The good you give and the good you get

Rechten: Alle rechten voorbehouden

The good you give and the good you get

Rechten: Alle rechten voorbehouden

Samenvatting

Voluntourism is a popular and still growing niche tourism market. A new generation of adventure-minded explorers is no longer content with just seeing, they want to be doing. They want to step out of their comfort zones, interact, help and learn from the community they visit. Especially helping unfortunate children in third world countries is popular amongst this generation.
However, there is growing literature on international volunteer tourism that questions its foundation on global citizenship, social consciousness and cross-cultural understanding. Moreover, critical views in forms of documentaries and media attention concerning this topic has been widely spread. Nevertheless, organizations involved in sending volunteers abroad to help unfortunate children has only increased. This industry is perceived to be a profit making one in which many organizations are more than willing to contribute. The Dutch being no exception.
Many Dutch sending organizations are willing to contribute to helping volunteers with that once-in-a-lifetime experience. Different processes are involved in sending these volunteers abroad but still many inconsistencies are feasible in doing wat is initially promised in these processes. The objective of this research is to identify different processes (which are later referred to as practices in this research) and reveal possibilities to suggest deliberate interventions for the integration of already existing guidelines created by the Better Care Network Netherlands. A network who fully commits itself to protect the rights of children everywhere and therefore in February 2014 created specific guidelines “The guidelines on the deployment of volunteers”, that give structure and advice for sending organizations and volunteers (BCNN, 2014).
With support of a social practice theory approach five different practices are identified, studied and analyzed and referred to as practices-as-performances. For the identification of these practices-as-performances a qualitative research is conducted in which different Dutch sending organizations were studied by means of interviewing key practitioners, observing, visits to events, meetings, conferences and the organization of a focus group. This research firstly describes the desirable practices and compares them with the contemporary practices to best reveal possible gaps and desired possible interventions. Different elements are used as analyzing tools such as meanings, materials and competences who play key roles in these practices. Knowledge, skills and visions are part of these elements for example.
It seems that shared passionate visions about the protection of unfortunate children and helping them by providing them with better future opportunities is widely agreed upon. Although knowledge and skills from both practitioners and volunteers in this industry are not in line with the desired practices. Nevertheless, many unexperienced volunteers are send abroad for a short period of time which generally does more harm than good meaning that the chances for a better future for these ‘volunteered’ children are very limited. Amongst other risks, attachment issues will occur making it difficult to build relationships for these children. Despite the risks, this industry remains popular meaning that transparency, knowledge transmission and awareness of these real risks become utterly important in the future.

Toon meer
OrganisatieHZ University of Applied Sciences
OpleidingVitaliteitsmanagement & Toerisme
InstituutScaldis Academy
PartnersBetter Care Network Netherlands
Gepubliceerd in
Datum2015-08-27
TypeBachelorscriptie
TaalEngels

Op de HBO Kennisbank vind je publicaties van 25 hogescholen

De grootste kennisbank van het HBO

Inspiratie op jouw vakgebied

Vrij toegankelijk