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Antibiotic use in children with acute respiratory or ear infections

prospective observational comparison of anthroposophic and conventional treatment under routine primary care conditions

Rechten: https://creativecommons.org/share-your-work/public-domain/cc0/

Antibiotic use in children with acute respiratory or ear infections

prospective observational comparison of anthroposophic and conventional treatment under routine primary care conditions

Rechten: https://creativecommons.org/share-your-work/public-domain/cc0/

Samenvatting

Children with acute respiratory or ear infections (RTI/OM) are often unnecessarily prescribed antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance is a major public health problem and antibiotic prescription for RTI/OM should be reduced. Anthroposophic treatment of RTI/OM includes anthroposophic medications, nonmedication therapy and if necessary also antibiotics. This secondary analysis from an observational study comprised 529 children <18 years from Europe (AT, DE, NL, and UK) or USA, whose caregivers had chosen to consult physicians offering anthroposophic (A-) or conventional (C-) treatment for RTI/OM. During the 28-day follow-up antibiotics were prescribed to 5.5% of A-patients and 25.6% of C-patients (); unadjusted odds ratio for nonprescription in A- versus C-patients 6.58 (95%-CI 3.45–12.56); after adjustment for demographics and morbidity 6.33 (3.17–12.64). Antibiotic prescription rates in recent observational studies with similar patients in similar settings, ranged from 31.0% to 84.1%. Compared to C-patients, A-patients also had much lower use of analgesics, somewhat quicker symptom resolution, and higher caregiver satisfaction. Adverse drug reactions were infrequent (2.3% in both groups) and not serious. Limitation was that results apply to children of caregivers who consult A-physicians. One cannot infer to what extent antibiotics might be avoided in children who usually receive C-treatment, if they were offered A-treatment.

Toon meer
OrganisatieHogeschool Leiden
AfdelingFaculteit Zorg
LectoraatAntroposofische Gezondheidszorg
Gepubliceerd inEvidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine Vol. vol.2014, Uitgave: Article ID 243801
Datum2014-11-18
TypeArtikel
DOI10.1155/2014/243801
TaalEngels

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