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The process of constructing a numerical simulation of the head difference around an artificial peninsula located in front of the coast of Zeeland

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The process of constructing a numerical simulation of the head difference around an artificial peninsula located in front of the coast of Zeeland

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Samenvatting

A few years ago the Dutch government set goals for sustainability. These goals include switching to fully sustainable energy production by 2050. Using only conventional sustainable energy production methods like solar panels and wind turbines will not result in achieving the set goals, so alternative methods of energy production must be examined. One of these alternatives is Dynamic Tidal Power (DTP), this method uses a long dam perpendicular to the coastline creating a difference in water level on opposite sides of the dam that can be used for generating electricity. According to static models, such a dam stretching for around 50 km in an area with a tidal velocity of 1 m/s could potentially generate 11,5 GWe , roughly a third of the power used in the Netherlands in 2013.
However, some aspects involving such a DPT plant are still uncertain before the government can make a decision regarding construction. One of these aspects is the actual difference in water level around the dam which triggers the rotation of the turbines installed in the dam. Without an accurate model of the situation no concrete predictions on the amount of electricity generated by the dam can be made. This means no predictions can be made on how profitable the dam will be and how long it would take to earn back the investments. This could all ultimately lead to a decision not to build such a DPT plant and potentially not reaching the goals set for 2050.
This study means to create a way to gain an understanding of the potential electric yield of a DPT plant through the input of several key parameters. Since, generally speaking, electric power is derived from a pressure component and a flow component, this means that the behaviour of the water level around such a dam due to the influence of the tidal wave (the pressure component) is key in deriving the electric yield of the plant. Therefore the following research question has been proposed:
“How can the water level, influenced by changing tides, around a 50 km dam stretching off the coast of Zeeland be numerically simulated?”
The main question can be split up in several minor questions for the different aspects that need to be considered:
• How can a static model regarding Dynamic Tidal Power be constructed?
• What is the influence of input parameters on the power output of the dam?
• How can the static model be transformed into a dynamic model?
• What software can best be used to construct the dynamic model?
These questions will lead to a model which can simulate the varying water level around the dam at different times of the day depending on the nature of the tidal wave. When a year’s average amplitude is used as input for the simulation the results will represent the overall power production in that particular year, resulting in an indication of how profitable such a DTP-plant could be.

Toon meer
OrganisatieHZ University of Applied Sciences
OpleidingAcademie voor Technologie & Innovatie
InstituutEngineering/ Energie- & Procestechnologie (AOT)
PartnersHZ University of Applied Sciences, Vlissingen
Gepubliceerd in
Datum2017-11-31
TypeBachelorscriptie
TaalEngels

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