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Lesbian, gay and bisexual rights in the European Union

Rechten: Alle rechten voorbehouden

Lesbian, gay and bisexual rights in the European Union

Rechten: Alle rechten voorbehouden

Samenvatting

Regarding labour law, sexual-orientation discrimination in the workplace is forbidden in all countries throughout the European Union, although there are some contradictions in the Dutch constitution regarding freedom of education and the equal treatment of individuals. So-called "special schools" can require their teachers and students to reject the homosexual lifestyle by
signing a contract. Regarding family law, the Netherlands have a leading
position, Germany lacks some rights in relation to taxes for same-sex
couples, but is moving in the right direction. Lithuania has no rights for "rainbow families" whatsoever. Lithuania even took a step back with a homophobic law recently where children are being "protected" from information on homo- and bisexuality.
The European Union had been active on this subject in the form of reports, resolutions, proposals and directives since 1984. The EU as well as the Council of Europe work on equal treatment for lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) people, also under pressure of gay rights movements. The EU does not have the competency to make directives regarding family law and therefore cannot pressure Member States to open up marriage to couples of the same sex. The importance of anti-discrimination legislation is stressed in policy making.
There are two international gay rights movements active in Europe, ILGA and EGALITE. ILGA functions as an umbrella organisation and lobbies for the LGB community regarding European law. EGALITE fought for the recognition of same-sex couples that are employed at the European institutions, which succeeded. They also strive for equality for EU civilians,. Furthermore, there exists an Intergroup that asks parliamentary questions and pressures the EP to realise the importance of tackling discriminations towards homo-
and bisexuals.
The Lisbon Treaty has a reference to the Charter of Human Rights, which makes the Charter legally binding. The Lisbon Treaty has somewhat expanded the EU's competency. With the ratification of this Treaty, it is possible to indirectly ensure equal treatment for all people, although it has no bearing on family law. The Treaty opens up a new path toward equal rights.
Step by step, the Union as well as the individual Member States are
generally moving towards equality for LGB people.

Toon meer
OrganisatieDe Haagse Hogeschool
AfdelingESC Europese Studies / European Studies
Jaar2010
TypeBachelorscriptie
TaalEngels

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